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The ABCs of AEDs on onebeatcpr.com

The ABCs of AEDs

What you need to know to save lives

We’ve seen it in movies and on TV dozens of times. Grandpa collapses in a shopping mall, mom faints at the airport, or young John from sales loses his balance at the gym and suddenly passes out. A friend or relative leaps into action and they start CPR. In real life, more often, folks are may also reach for an Automated External Defibrillator (AED).

What is (and isn’t) an AED?

A defibrillator is a medical device that stops fibrillation, an erratic heartbeat, by distributing an electrical shock or pulse of approximately 300 joules to the heart. This restores the heart to normal by stopping its uncontrolled trembling. The AED was developed in 1965 by Frank Pantridge, a physician at the Royal Victoria Infirmary in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

The goal was to allow lay people without medical training to use this technology to assist those in the midst of sudden cardiac arrest or who experience arrhythmia (an uneven heartbeat). Frank was of the firm belief that anyone who could perform CPR could operate a defibrillator. Further, he advocated that they are installed beside fire extinguishers, as life was more important than property.

The original prototype ran off car batteries and weighed close to a whopping 155 pounds, compared to today’s models which have a relative feather-weight of just over four pounds. He first installed the “portable” defibrillator in an ambulance, which allowed for patients experiencing cardiac arrest to receive treatment prior to arrival at the hospital. The technology quickly spread to the United States.

One common misconception about AEDs is that they can be used when the heart flat lines, or ceases to beat at all (diehard fans of ER or Grey’s Anatomy can be forgiven this false assumption). Defibrillators typically don’t completely restart the heart, they reset our body’s natural pacemaker so it functions properly.

An AED is also not to be confused with similar devices, such as Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (ICDs) or Wearable Cardioverter Defibrillators (WCDs). ICDs are battery-powered devices that are surgically implanted under the skin and connect to the heart via thin wires. They monitor the heart and send a shock if they detect an abnormal rhythm. WCDs perform similar functions but can be worn underneath clothing as a combination garment and monitor.

How does an AED work?

While the very concept of saving another person’s life can be daunting for most of us, the modern AED has been designed to make this miraculous task surprisingly simple. Each AED contains adhesive pads with electrodes which the user attaches to the victim’s chest. This is a simplified system based on hospital defibrillators, which use conductive gel to move the electricity along and hand-held panels with plastic handles to prevent medical professionals from experiencing the shock.

Proper placement of these pads is key to effectively assist the victim. There are two basic options:

  • Place one pad above and to the left of the heart, the other below and to the right.
  • Place the pads in front of and behind the heart.

The electrodes provide the AED’s computer with crucial information about the heart’s rhythm, that allows it to determine whether an electric shock is necessary and then to provide that shock. AEDs can be used on adults and children as young as 12 months (some devices have specially-sized pads for kids).

When should I use an AED?

Time is of the essence when a person goes into cardiac arrest. Most incidents stem from ventricular fibrillation (VF), a rapid and unsynchronized rhythm that begins in the heart’s lower chambers, or ventricles. Experts estimate that a victim’s chance of survival drops by seven to 10 percent every minute that a normal heartbeat isn’t restored.

First, be sure the person is actually in cardiac arrest. If you see them faint or come upon them already unconscious, confirm that they don’t respond to speaking, shouting, or shaking. In the case of an infant or young child, avoid shaking and instead give them a gentle but firm pinch. Check for breathing and a pulse. If neither is present, call 9-1-1, begin CPR, and seek out an AED.

You can often find AEDs in settings where crowds gather, such as schools, airports, gyms, malls, pools, hotels, and sports venues. They are easily recognizable and look much like a large first-aid kit, often with a heart logo emblazoned on the front.

Clear other bystanders from the immediate area, as touching the victim can interfere with the AED’s readings. Most AEDs provide voice commands that take you through each step of its use. Again, CPR is a key tool and should be administered before or after a shock. The device will likely instruct you when to begin CPR.

The effectiveness of AEDs can be profound. The American Heart Association estimates that survival rates double when bystanders use AEDs before emergency responders arrive. One Beat CPR can be a valuable partner in your organization’s AED purchases and training. You can learn more at our online store and resource guide.

First Aid Preparedness — Having trained personnel ready and willing to render first aid will reassure other co-workers and make them feel safer themselves.

An OSHA enforcement case announced in December 2016 is a good example of the kind of worker injury where a co-worker might have to respond quickly with first aid assistance. The agency proposed $274,934 in penalties against an Ohio plastics manufacturer after a pneumatic bench cutter severed a 27-year-old employee’s finger as she cut rubber material in June 2016. Along with the penalties came four repeated, six serious, and three other-than-serious violations filed by OSHA against the company, which also was placed in the OSHA Severe Violators Enforcement Program, according to OSHA.

The key standards for ensuring employees are ready and able to provide first aid care to an injured or sick co-worker are familiar ones. The OSHA standard for general industry include logging operations, medical services and first aid, first aid kits, and both first aid training and CPR training.

First aid trainers note that immediate treatment of an injured or ill employee could save that person’s life. Minutes count for injured or sick employees—equally important, having trained first aid personnel ready and willing to respond will reassure other co-workers and make them feel safer themselves. Training helps to prevent safety issues as well as to manage events, should they occur.

One Beat CPR + AED provides first aid and CPR training. CPR/AED and first aid certifications are good for two years.

 

Read the full article here: https://ohsonline.com/Articles/2017/04/01/First-Aid-Preparedness.aspx?Page=1

An AED saved Bob Harper, but could you find one in an emergency?

Celebrity fitness trainer Bob Harper says an AED – an automatic external defibrillator – helped save his life when he suffered a heart attack at his gym. But if an emergency took place at your office, school or gym, could you find one? TODAY national investigative correspondent Jeff Rossen tests some real gym patrons.

The takeaway, today we should go to our workplaces, to our schools, to our gyms and find the defibrillator now so that we are prepared when an emergency occurs. If something happens, someone should be grabbing the AED and someone should be grabbing an employee.

Bob Harper on his heart attack: ‘I had what they call a widow-maker’. In an exclusive interview with TODAY’s Savannah Guthrie, celebrity fitness trainer Bob Harper talks about the shocking heart attack he suffered 50 days ago. “I was in full cardiac arrest; my heart was stopped,” Harper says. Of his road to recovery, he says “It’s been hard,” but he vows to enjoy “very single day” of his life from now on, and urges viewers to have their own hearts checked if they have a family history.

Bob Harper closes the segment with, “I will never, ever walk into a gym again that doesn’t have CPR — people that know their CPR — and there is an AED somewhere in that gym…I will make sure that every place has something like that.”

http://www.today.com/video/an-aed-saved-bob-harper-but-could-you-find-one-in-an-emergency-914401859854

http://www.today.com/video/bob-harper-on-his-heart-attack-i-had-what-they-call-a-widow-maker-913537091798

http://www.today.com/video/bob-harper-on-road-to-recovery-50-days-after-shocking-heart-attack-913538115630

We’re going to the 2017 Golf Industry Show, see you there!

Join us at this year’s Golf Industry Show. This conference is the largest education event in the industry and covers all aspects of golf course management, including agronomics, environmental management, communications, leadership and business management. There are many seminars to attend and the trade show has hundreds of exhibitors spanning thousands of square feet of exhibit space. The GIS trade show gives superintendents, owners, technicians and other golf facility professionals the opportunity to network and discuss the latest products and services in turf and facility care.

An AED is a key component of an emergency response plan. Stop by booth #1808 to learn more about defibrillators and golf course and facility safety.

 

February is Heart Month!

Today marks the first day of Heart Month! Heart Month will run from Feb 1 – 28, 2017. Check back daily for exciting news and event information.

        Heart disease is the leading cause of death for American adults, accounting for 1 in 4 deaths in the United States. Nearly half of Americans have at least one risk factor for heart disease, such as high blood pressure, obesity, physical inactivity, or an unhealthy diet. Risk also increases with age.
        Individuals of all ages can reduce their risk by making lifestyle changes and managing medical conditions with proper treatment. Take a CPR/AED class. Encourage your family members to make heart-healthy changes and offer support along the way.
        Our 2017 Heart Month focus is prevention. Learn more about heart disease prevention and heart-healthy behavior changes!
        We kick off the month with National Go Red Day on Friday, Feb. 3rd. On National Wear Red Day, be sure to wear something red to show your support for women with heart disease and stroke.
#HeartMonth #GoRedWearRed #OneBeatCPR

Parents unite to combat sudden cardiac arrest among young athletes

As TODAY’s “Winning at All Costs” series focusing some of the risks and dangers facing young athletes, Jenna Bush Hager speaks to One Beat CPR + AED partner, Parent Heart Watch, a group of parents who are trying to save kids’ lives in memory of the children they lost to sudden cardiac arrest during sports activities. It “can happen to any child,” one parent warns – but the chance of surviving it rises dramatically if an automated external defibrillator is nearby and accessible.

For more information or to purchase AEDs visit www.onebeatcpr.com or call 855.ONE.BEAT.

Click the link below to view the TODAY show segment.

today-show

 

http://www.today.com/video/parents-unite-to-combat-sudden-cardiac-arrest-among-young-athletes-793007171510

One Beat CPR + AED Summer Scavenger Hunt with Children’s Cardiomyopathy Foundation

Childrens-Cardiomyopathy-foundation-one-beat-cpr

For the third year in a row, One Beat CPR, Children’s Cardiomyopathy Foundation and the American Camp Association are sponsoring the My Camp AED summer scavenger hunt.

We want to encourage all ages to find the nearest AED in camps across the nation. It is a summer-long initiative that brings attention to the importance of locating a defibrillator in time during an emergency. #ProtectingKidsHearts #MyCampAED #OneBeatCPR

Facebook-kids-one-beat-cpr-mycampaed-onebeatcpr

They found their AED! Join the Scavenger Hunt and find yours.. Ready, Set, GO!

Sheriff’s Deputy Awarded for Saving Life with CPR and AED

To Montgomery County Sheriff’s Deputy Ethan Moss, February 4th response to a 911 call was just part of the routine, but for homeowners, Tim and Roby Bush, Deputy Moss was a hero that day.  Upon finding Tim Bush unresponsive and not breathing, Deputy Moss immediately administered the automated external defibrillator (AED) and started CPR.  After just 2 minutes, Bush began breathing on his own and was transported to the hospital. The 54 year old has since been discharged from the Hospital and made a full recovery.  Deputy Moss received a Commendation award for saving the man’s life.

Montgomery County Sheriff John Fuson presents Deputy Ethan Moss with a commendation award for saving a man’s life.

Montgomery County Sheriff John Fuson presents Deputy Ethan Moss with a commendation award for saving a man’s life.

Deputy Moss, a four year veteran of the Sheriff’s Office, husband and father of two boys, and United States Army veteran, is no stranger to saving lives. In July of 2015, Moss also saved a 62 year old man by administering an AED and CPR.

Law enforcement is often the first on scene to a medical emergency. Receiving CPR and first aid training and carrying an AED enables them to act quickly to save a life.  Deputy Moss was quick to apply his training to save a life; Mr. and Mrs. Bush couldn’t be more grateful.