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Women Receive CPR Less Often Than Men on onebeatcpr.com

Women Receive CPR Less Often Than Men

A study reveals more women die from cardiac arrest – because bystanders may be afraid of performing CPR

A recent study sponsored by the American Heart Association (AHA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) looked at almost 20,000 cases of cardiac arrest. The study found that only 39% of women experiencing cardiac arrest in public were given CPR, whereas 45% of men received it.

The men studied were 23% more likely to survive.

Women and heart disease

Heart attacks and cardiac arrest are sometimes thought of as a male issue, but women suffer from these conditions and heart disease overall at alarming rates:

  • “Heart disease is the leading cause of death of American women, killing more than a third of them.”
  • “More than 200,000 women die each year from heart attacks – five times as many women as breast cancer.”
  • “More than 159,000 women die each year of congestive heart failure, accounting for 56.3% of all heart failure deaths.”

These numbers are a bit lower but similar in scope to the numbers for men. So, why the disparity in the number of female lives saved thanks to CPR?

Fear of rendering aid

While the study shows that strangers are more willing to help men experiencing cardiac arrest than women, “no gender difference was apparent in CPR rates for people who had taken ill at home, where a rescuer is more likely to know the person needing help.”

Some of the reasons cited:

  • “’It can be kind of daunting thinking about pushing hard and fast on the center of a woman’s chest’ making some people fearful of hurting the woman,’ said Audrey Blewer, a University of Pennsylvania researcher who led the study. …
  • Another study leader, Dr. Benjamin Abella, said that bystanders are worried about moving a woman’s clothes or touching her breasts, despite the fact that if you administer CPR in the correct manner, you wouldn’t even need to do this.”

There is also fear about being held legally liable for rendering aid that could harm someone, though as we’ve covered in a previous blog, every state has Good Samaritan laws on the books that protect people trying to save a life. In some states, however, you do need to be certified in CPR to have protection under these laws.

What about mouth-to-mouth resuscitation?

When most of us think of CPR, we think of pressing on the chest and mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. But The American Heart Association has recently revised CPR procedures to make rescue breathing optional when rendering care to adults or teens. This “hands-only CPR” is simple and it works:

  • A study led by Dr. Ken Nagao at Tokyo’s Surugadai Nihon University Hospital examined the implications of this failure to respond. Cardiac arrest victims on whom no CPR was applied (approximately 70% of 4,068 incidents) were not only far less likely to survive, their chances of suffering brain damage from the incident increased if they did pull through.
  • 18% of the victims in the study received traditional CPR that included mouth-to-mouth. Those patients saw an improved survival and recovery rate. 11% of those in the study had the chest-compression-only technique applied – and they were 2.2 times less likely to experience brain damage than those who didn’t receive any CPR at all.
  • Hands-only CPR cannot be used on small children and infants, nor individuals who have been found unconscious or definitively suffered the respiratory failure that leads to cardiac arrest. For greater detail, read our blog: “Hands-Only CPR vs. Traditional CPR.”

A 3-hour class gets you certified

Three hours is all it takes to become CPR and AED certified. This is a skill that you can carry with you the rest of your life and you’ll be prepared to take life-saving action on a moment’s notice – on men, women, or children – whether they are strangers or loved ones.

Help reverse the statistics and learn to save lives equally.

One Beat CPR+AED offers American Heart Association-certified CPR and AED courses to South Florida businesses, schools, medical professionals, families, and individuals. Call 1-800-ONE-BEAT for the latest class schedule, or connect with us online.

Graduate with a Life-Saving Skill on onebeatcpr.com

Graduate with a Life-Saving Skill

Why students should learn CPR, even if their school doesn’t require it

Whether you’ve been out of school for decades or still have some years left before you graduate, almost certainly at one time or another you’ve had this thought during a class: “When are we ever going to use this?”

While school teaches us many important lessons and lots of good information, not everything is relevant to our daily lives. When, for example, was the last time you had to solve an equation outside of algebra class?

This is why when a valuable skill is taught – like CPR – it should be welcomed by everyone. Unfortunately, CPR training is not mandatory in all schools across the country. Right now, it is a graduation requirement in high schools in 38 states and the District of Columbia.

Florida, however, is not included on that list. Two attempts by the legislature in recent years to change this have both failed. But this shouldn’t stop high school (or college) students in Florida from seeking training on their own.

How teens can benefit from CPR training

CPR training is beneficial for everyone, and perhaps teenagers especially because it gives them:

Life-saving ability

According to statistics from the American Heart Association, an average of 475,000 people in the U.S. die from cardiac arrest every year. And about 350,000 of cardiac arrests happen outside of a hospital. This means that the vast majority of people experiencing this trauma rely on bystanders for assistance. The survival rate for victims who get help is around 45 percent. Knowing CPR is the best way to save a life, whether it’s that of a friend, classmate, older family member, or younger sibling.

Confidence

Even if it is never used, knowing CPR can instill confidence in someone. Understanding what needs to be done in the event of an emergency can help a teen keep a cool head in a crisis.

A skill employers look for

For students looking for an after-school job or summer work, being able to put CPR training on their resume can give them an edge. For lifeguards or anything that involves children, this is a must. Someone seeking a gig babysitting could put a parent’s mind at ease knowing he or she has CPR knowledge. Even for volunteer work – at a nursing home, for example – this is a skill that can come in handy.

Real-life examples

It’s easy to say why it is important for people to learn CPR, but the message really hits home when you see the results. Here are just a few recent examples:

High school senior saves stranger’s life on New York City street

Just a couple weeks after learning CPR at his high school – which is mandatory in New York –

Anthony Rosa Conpres saved the life of a man who collapsed on a street in the Bronx.

Lacrosse player uses CPR to save the life of his teammate

When Colby Clay collapsed after being hit in the chest with a lacrosse ball during practice at his high school in Beaverton, Oregon, teammate Ben Wu’s CPR skills saved his life.

Senior saves senior: High school student uses CPR on an elderly man

High school senior Alex Cowie was working at the Action Fitness Gym in Hillsboro, Missouri, when she saw an older man suddenly collapse. Using the CPR skills she learned in school, she helped save the man’s life. Since CPR training became a requirement in Missouri high schools, this was the third time a student has used CPR to save a life in Hillsboro.

Don’t wait until Florida makes it mandatory in schools

If you’re a student, a parent of a student, or an educator, you should know that regardless of the state laws, CPR training is useful for everyone. At One Beat CPR + AED, our classes are taught by first responders with years of experience. Plus, we can bring the training to you. For more information, please get in touch.

The Most Productive Way to Spend Three Hours

The Most Productive Way to Spend Three Hours on onebeatcpr.com

If you’re looking to put those three hours to good use, consider learning to administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)

Does it surprise you to know you’ll get more than 4.7 billion suggestions from Google if you ask the search engine about things you can do in three hours? Most range from the practical, such as running a marathon and cooking a 14-pound turkey – to the absurdly specific, such as getting coronary bypass surgery to taking a tour aboard the S.S. Minnow.

If you’re looking to put those three hours to good use, consider learning to administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The average CPR course takes only about three hours, rewarding you with a lifetime skill that can save lives. Here’s what’s in store for you:

What will I learn?

  • The American Heart Association describes cardiopulmonary resuscitation in plain English as an emergency lifesaving procedure performed when the heart stops beating. Immediate CPR can double or triple chances of survival after cardiac arrest. CPR is important because it helps to keep blood flow active, and this extends the opportunity for a successful resuscitation once trained emergency medical staff to arrive.
  • One thing you’ll discover is a common misunderstanding about CPR. It doesn’t restart a heart after cardiac arrest. The timed compressions to a person’s chest cavity only help to keep blood flow active. To restart a heart after cardiac arrest, you would need an automated external defibrillator (AED), and you’ll learn about these devices during quality training.
  • The course will teach you how to perform CPR on adults, as well as children. You’ll also get insight into why men are also more likely to receive CPR than women – but hopefully, you’ll help to reverse these statistics.The CPR process has to be slightly modified to perform on children below a certain age, and you’ll learn about these variations during the class. Even children themselves can be taught to perform CPR. Recent studies show that children in the sixth grade are capable of using hands-only CPR to save lives.
  • A portion of the class will help you to understand the difference between cardiac arrest and a heart attack. It’s important to know the difference – especially the link between both, and what you should immediately do in each case.

You’ll also learn that, like many lifelong skills, it’s important to review what you’ve learned by taking a CPR recertification class. And, yes, after taking a three-hour CPR course – especially when it’s certified by the American Heart Association – you will be officially certified to perform this life-saving procedure.

Where can I take a CPR course?

The American Heart Association has many authorized training locations throughout the United States, where you can take a course. If you’re interested and have the time, you can learn additional skills as well. For example, you might want to supplement your CPR training with a First Aid course.

This is usually an instructor-led course that teaches you critical skills to respond to and manage an injury in the first few minutes until emergency medical services arrive. You’ll learn the duties and responsibilities, as well as first aid actions for many common medical emergencies such as choking, cuts, broken bones, sprains, insect bites or stings, strokes, and more.

Got three free hours? Use it to become a life-saver! Check here for available course dates and times.

CPR and AEDs Save More Than Just Lives

CPR and AEDs Save More Than Just Lives on onebeatcpr.com

How employee CPR training preserves and promotes company morale

Until you’ve experienced loss, it’s difficult to truly understand how deeply it impacts every aspect of a person’s life. Grief can be crippling, even if the death is outside of a person’s family, after all, our colleagues are often more a part of our daily lives than extended family.

A 2002 paper drafted by Dr. Kirsti A. Dyer assessed the impact the death of a co-worker has on companies. Dr. Dyer explained that grieving the loss of a co-worker “can upset workers and hamper the work environment. Unfortunately, most businesses cannot afford to halt production, sales or services to accommodate the grief response.”

Fortunately, many of these deaths can be prevented.

Putting the odds in your favor

According to OSHA, approximately 10,000 Americans suffer a sudden cardiac arrest at work each year. If there’s not help already on the scene, waiting for emergency medical assistance only offers about a 7-10% chance of survival. However, when automated external defibrillators (AEDs) and trained individuals are on site, the overall survival rate increases by 70%, and “studies with immediate defibrillation have shown up to 60% survival one year after sudden cardiac arrest.”

The American Red Cross and OSHA believe in the lifesaving power of CPR training enough to provide hero stories on their websites. An excellent example is the case of George Hickman, an employee at Honeywell FM&T in Kansas City, Missouri.

When Hickman was overtaken by cardiac arrest, six of his colleagues sprang into action. Two immediately administered CPR, while another called emergency services. Security quickly arrived with an AED – the shock revived his pulse and an oxygen mask was placed over his mouth well before paramedics arrived.

Hickman survived, and instead of months of grieving, business went on, presumably with a considerable boost in morale and stronger employee bonds.

“It is quite humbling to stand here in front of six gentlemen who saved my life,” stated Hickman at a Red Cross awards ceremony. “Every day is a blessing. It can end in a heartbeat. I appreciate your chest compressions and thank you for paying attention in the CPR course.”

Automated external defibrillator (AED) courses

A fibrillation is a spasm of a muscle caused by uncoordinated individual fibrils (muscle fibers). Sudden cardiac arrest is caused by either ventricular fibrillation or when the heart completely stops beating, most frequently the former. AEDs analyze the heart’s rhythm and then send a jolt of electricity calibrated to correct the fibrillation, allowing the heart to beat normally again.

Fortunately, AEDs are relatively easy to use – many American Heart Association Approved training facilities provide courses for both individuals and entire companies.

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) courses

It’s important for employees to know what to do before and after an AED arrives – it saved George Hickman’s life.

Each of Hickman’s colleagues fell right back on their training, from delegating tasks, to applying an oxygen mask after he was resuscitated. Consider how empowered everyone at Kansas City’s Honeywell FM&T branch felt after seeing their CPR training put to use to save their colleague’s life.

Turn your staff into heroes

The sooner you launch a CPR training initiative for your employees, the less likely you are to face a grieving workforce. One Beat CPR provides AED and CPR training, along with AED units, so your staff can add “life saver” to their list of specialties.

For more information on company and individual CPR and AED training packages, contact us today.

First Responder Stories

First Responder Stories on onebeatcpr.com

Inspiring accounts of police officers using CPR to save lives

Every day, America’s police officers perform a number of duties to keep us safe. They’re the mediators of public disturbances, the enforcers of law and order, guides for the lost, and educators on many important issues society faces, such as drug use and neighborhood security. Not least of a police officer’s many functions is to provide first response medical care in emergency situations.

Frequently, the news reports how these officers take time out from putting their lives on the line to save the lives of others; men, women, children…even beloved pets. When they do, it’s their knowledge of CPR that can make all the difference in sudden and potentially fatal situations.

Protecting the next generation

Did you know there are important differences between adult and child CPR that could be critical in saving a life? Officer Chase Miller does. He put that knowledge to good use to save three year old Brayden Geis from a febrile seizure. Working in conjunction with Brayden’s father, Officer Chase acted surely and swiftly and was honored by his city council with the Life Saving Award, not to mention the profound gratitude of Brayden’s parents.

Deputy Steve Donaldson brought his skills to bear to save the life of a 15-month-old boy in Tampa, Florida. His story is a perfect example of the human side of law enforcement and CPR. When it’s a life or death situation, it takes bravery and self-control to perform under that kind of pressure. Even though Deputy Donaldson admitted to being “more scared than the mother was,” he stuck to his training and the worst was prevented. Young Cory had stopped breathing in a case very similar to Brayden Geis’ after a fever became potentially fatal. The deputy was likewise honored and rewarded for a job well done.

Every life matters

The image of a first responder saving a beloved family pet is even more endearing in reality, as the combined efforts of these firefighters and police officers proves. Dante and Lisa Cosetino stood to lose their beloved cats after the pets were pulled unresponsive from the flames of a house fire. The police officers on the scene weren’t about to accept defeat; they chose to improvise and apply CPR techniques along with oxygen to the stricken animals … and brought them back to life.

Vital steps in law enforcement CPR

Not every story has such a happy ending. Still, when the worst happens it can be a catalyst for positive and lasting change. In August of this year, New York’s Governor Cuomo passed Briana’s Law: legislation that requires every NYPD officer (and state police) to be certified in CPR and recertified on a two-year basis.

How AEDs support CPR

Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) are devices which allow for rapid and effective action when cardiac irregularities occur. They’re the perfect partner to CPR training, yet even without that training AEDs are easy to use. They’re extremely lightweight, can be carried anywhere, and user-friendly. Studies show the average third grader is capable of following the automated instructions to successfully deliver a life-saving shock.

This dramatic video shows Canton, Georgia police officers Patrick Duncan and Jimmy Butler taking action to save the life of a weight lifter who suffered a sudden cardiac arrest. The presence of an AED coupled with the capable performance of the officers saved a life in a situation where only 10 in every 100 cases end in survival. This event inspired the Canton City Council to equip all of their patrol vehicles with AEDs.

How to get heart-saving equipment

If you’re a member of a police department who want to be equipped with AEDs but are up against funding issues, then help is at hand. From grants to private funding, there are a number of avenues which could provide financial assistance.

At One Beat CPR, it’s our mission to provide the best equipment, and to educate the public and emergency responders through our classes taught by certified fire fighters, police officers, and paramedics. Our prices for AEDs and their replacement accessories are the lowest in the industry, and our training and certification programs cover nine major areas including CPR and AED, basic and advanced life support and First Aid.

This year’s IACP (International Association of Chiefs of Police) conference and expo in Philadelphia will be covering a host of pertinent issues in law enforcement, including new techniques for predicting and preventing the number one killer of police: heart attack. Pages 19 and 20 give the outline for this part of the program, and highlight how vital it is to remember that those who save us are also at risk.

As the stories above attest, the right skills and equipment are what give our police and other life savers the power to prevent tragedy.

One Beat CPR is Florida’s leading CPR training center. A family owned business with over 17 years of experience, we offer qualified instructional courses and the lowest AED and accessory prices in the industry. To learn more about our passion for life, you can call at 954.321.5305, toll free at 855.663.2328 or get in touch via our contact form.

Do All Police Officers Know CPR?

Do All Police Officers Know CPR? on onebeatcpr.com

Better training could save lives

It should be a no-brainer to make sure all police officers are adequately trained in CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation). After all, cops are often the first ones to the scenes of car wrecks, shootings, and other potentially deadly events. And the sooner critically injured people get CPR, the better their chances of survival.

Yet several high-profile cases show that not all officers are competent in the lifesaving procedure. And even more are not qualified to operate AEDs (automated external defibrillators), which can save the lives of people stricken by sudden cardiac arrest.

“Police work regularly places officers in urgent situations with critically injured people,” Farzan A. Nahvi, an emergency medicine physician at New York University Langone Medical Center, said in an article in The New York Times. “If a person isn’t getting oxygen to his brain, permanent brain damage occurs after about four minutes, and death occurs within about six minutes.”

He adds that the average EMT response time in New York City is seven minutes, which makes the first responder’s capabilities in CPR even more vital.

In one well-publicized 2014 case, NYPD officer Peter Liang accidentally shot a man named Akai Gurley in a Brooklyn housing project. As Gurley lay dying, his girlfriend futilely performed CPR while being coached by a 911 dispatcher. Liang later admitted that he thought Gurley’s girlfriend “was more qualified than me” in CPR.

An investigation into the death revealed that Liang and his partner both had CPR training at the Police Academy, but neither felt confident in performing it.

In another landmark case, 11-year-old Briana Ojeda died from an acute asthma attack in 2010, in part because the responding officer didn’t know CPR. She was the daughter of state Assemblyman Felix Ortiz, and he sponsored a bill not only requiring adequate CPR training for police officers but also recertification every two years. Incredibly, the bill died in the state senate five times – due to funding concerns – before it was finally passed this year. It’s now known as “Briana’s law.”

Police “should not be afraid, or lack the training, to do what is necessary to try and save a life,” declares Ortiz.

Many cities and states throughout the nation have adequate CPR training and certification for their law enforcement officers, but it remains inconsistent.

“Police training protocols differ between each police department,” notes Danielle Thor, Director of Temple University EMS in Philadelphia. “For many departments it is required, but for others it may only be suggested.”

Some police departments simply don’t make emergency medical attention a priority. After the New Orleans PD was criticized for not doing enough to help shooting victims in a 2014 incident, a spokesman stated: “The police officer is a police officer. They’re not a nurse, they’re not a doctor. They get fundamental training in CPR, and that’s all they can do, if nothing else is taxing their time at that moment.”

AED training also important for cops

Many experts recommend that cops not only get trained in CPR but also in the use of AEDs. More than 325,000 Americans suffer a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) each year. Usually, the only way to get the heart beating properly again is by employing an AED, which uses an electrical impulse to basically jump-start the heart. Experts say that defibrillation within three minutes of a SCA improves the survival rate by a whopping 70 percent.

This is particularly relevant for police because of the increasing use of Tasers in subduing suspects. Some experts believe the shock that disables a person can also cause a potentially deadly arrhythmia. Meanwhile, defibrillators are becoming more common in workplaces, and many police departments are making them standard equipment in squad cars.

A National Institutes of Health study concluded, “The majority of police officers can be trained to use an AED safely and effectively within a three-hour AED course. During this course, they also improve on their basic lifesaving skills.”

Adequate training in CPR and AEDs would no doubt help fulfill the policemen’s motto, “to serve and protect” citizens at the highest level – by saving lives. That is also the goal of One Beat CPR. We offer CPR and AED training certified by the American Heart Association and the American Safety & Health Institute; we are also one of the nation’s largest distributors of AEDs and accessories. For more information, call us at 954.321.5305, toll free at 855.663.2328 or get in touch via our contact form.

June is the Perfect Time to Raise Awareness of CPR

June is the Perfect Time to Raise Awareness of CPR on onebeatcpr.com

If more people knew CPR, thousands of lives could be saved each year

Did you know that sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is the leading cause of death in the U.S.? More than 350,000 people die each year from SCA, which is almost 960 individuals every single day. Another sobering statistic: The survival rate for people who suffer cardiac arrest outside of a hospital and are treated by Emergency Medical Services is only about 10 percent.

The good news? When CPR is performed immediately and an AED is available, the chances of survival can double or even triple. CPR and AED training is vital. This is especially good to remember now, as the first week of June is designated as CPR Awareness Week. Here’s a great example of what CPR can do:

Last August, Manhattan financial executive Jeffrey Feig was on vacation when he went into cardiac arrest and stopped breathing. Immediately, people took action. While one person called an ambulance, another started chest compressions. A third person began mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, and a fourth grabbed an AED and used it to get his heart back to a normal rhythm. Thanks to these trained individuals, Feig not only survived, but he didn’t suffer any lasting heart or brain damage.

While remarkable, this story isn’t entirely uncommon. Many lives have been saved due to quick thinking and CPR/AED training. So why don’t more people get trained or take action when someone needs help? There are many myths surrounding SCA, including:

  • It’s better to wait for medical professionals to arrive

Every second is critical when some is in cardiac arrest. For each minute that someone doesn’t get CPR or defibrillation, their chances of survival go down by 7 to 10 percent.

  • Elderly people are the only ones affected

The truth is that sudden cardiac arrest can happen to anyone and, in fact, over 7,000 instances every year affect youths under age 18. And remember Jeffrey Feig? He was only 50.

  • Only people with a history of heart problems can suffer from SCA

In many cases, someone may not know they have a heart problem until they go into cardiac arrest.

  • Untrained people can’t operate an AED

AEDs are now fairly easy to use, with clear directions that are simple to follow. Untrained users can and do save lives. That said, training should be encouraged to ensure their proper use.

  • An AED will hurt someone by shocking them

If someone is in cardiac arrest, this means that they are clinically dead, so a shock won’t hurt them. AEDs are safe when used properly, and the shocks are designed to get the heart beating as it should.

More good news: Recognizing how important CPR is, many people are now deciding to take classes or refresher courses. In fact, just two weeks before Jeffrey Feig went into cardiac arrest, the place where he was staying had conducted a class so people could learn CPR.

Feel like it’s time you finally learned CPR, or simply want to brush up on your knowledge? You can schedule training with One Beat CPR right now. We offer an assortment of classes that cover all life-saving tactics, including CPR, AEDs, first aid, and advanced cardiac life support. Taught by paramedics, police officers, and firefighters, this training can take place in your home or business.

If you are ever in a situation where you would need to administer CPR to a friend, co-worker, or even a stranger, you will be glad you know what to do. And if you’re the one in distress, you’ll be grateful that someone nearby got the right training. For more information about One Beat CPR and what we can do for you, can send us a message through our online contact form.

Spotify Playlist Showcases Songs for CPR, Like “Stayin’ Alive” These Tunes Are 100 Beats Per Minute

CPR, when performed properly,  can increase the chances of surviving cardiac arrest. More important than going really fast is to set a steady tempo to keep blood pumping, much like a regular heartbeat. The rate of compressions should be between 100 and 120 beats per minute. Oftentimes, the Bee Gees classic “Stayin’ Alive” is used to help keep pace, but there are a number songs from different times and genres with the same tempo. In those chaotic moments when you’re trying to save a life, any of these songs will help you focus on a regular rhythm. This playlist developed by New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Spotify “Songs to do CPR to” playlist, help administer chest compressions at a steady pace. They’ve selected more than 40 songs that are all 100 beats per minute, the recommended tempo for CPR.

From the classics, like the Bee Gees’ “Stayin’ Alive” and “Dancing Queen” by ABBA, to more contemporary, there are songs for everyone to have something to sing in their head during a critical moment. Movie buffs will appreciate the Star Wars Imperial March, while more contemporary options like Adele’s “Rumor Has It” and Justin Bieber’s “Sorry” might be more familiar to the younger set.

Most cardiac arrests happen in homes or private settings. The American Heart Association estimates over 90 percent of those people die before making it to the hospital. If performed properly, CPR can double or triple the chances of survival. Initiating CPR as soon as possible is important because it keeps the blood oxygenated. It oxygen is not circulating throughout the body, the brain dies.

To take a look at the New-York Presbyterian Spotify playlist, click here.

 

 

First Aid Preparedness — Having trained personnel ready and willing to render first aid will reassure other co-workers and make them feel safer themselves.

An OSHA enforcement case announced in December 2016 is a good example of the kind of worker injury where a co-worker might have to respond quickly with first aid assistance. The agency proposed $274,934 in penalties against an Ohio plastics manufacturer after a pneumatic bench cutter severed a 27-year-old employee’s finger as she cut rubber material in June 2016. Along with the penalties came four repeated, six serious, and three other-than-serious violations filed by OSHA against the company, which also was placed in the OSHA Severe Violators Enforcement Program, according to OSHA.

The key standards for ensuring employees are ready and able to provide first aid care to an injured or sick co-worker are familiar ones. The OSHA standard for general industry include logging operations, medical services and first aid, first aid kits, and both first aid training and CPR training.

First aid trainers note that immediate treatment of an injured or ill employee could save that person’s life. Minutes count for injured or sick employees—equally important, having trained first aid personnel ready and willing to respond will reassure other co-workers and make them feel safer themselves. Training helps to prevent safety issues as well as to manage events, should they occur.

One Beat CPR + AED provides first aid and CPR training. CPR/AED and first aid certifications are good for two years.

 

Read the full article here: https://ohsonline.com/Articles/2017/04/01/First-Aid-Preparedness.aspx?Page=1

An AED saved Bob Harper, but could you find one in an emergency?

Celebrity fitness trainer Bob Harper says an AED – an automatic external defibrillator – helped save his life when he suffered a heart attack at his gym. But if an emergency took place at your office, school or gym, could you find one? TODAY national investigative correspondent Jeff Rossen tests some real gym patrons.

The takeaway, today we should go to our workplaces, to our schools, to our gyms and find the defibrillator now so that we are prepared when an emergency occurs. If something happens, someone should be grabbing the AED and someone should be grabbing an employee.

Bob Harper on his heart attack: ‘I had what they call a widow-maker’. In an exclusive interview with TODAY’s Savannah Guthrie, celebrity fitness trainer Bob Harper talks about the shocking heart attack he suffered 50 days ago. “I was in full cardiac arrest; my heart was stopped,” Harper says. Of his road to recovery, he says “It’s been hard,” but he vows to enjoy “very single day” of his life from now on, and urges viewers to have their own hearts checked if they have a family history.

Bob Harper closes the segment with, “I will never, ever walk into a gym again that doesn’t have CPR — people that know their CPR — and there is an AED somewhere in that gym…I will make sure that every place has something like that.”

http://www.today.com/video/an-aed-saved-bob-harper-but-could-you-find-one-in-an-emergency-914401859854

http://www.today.com/video/bob-harper-on-his-heart-attack-i-had-what-they-call-a-widow-maker-913537091798

http://www.today.com/video/bob-harper-on-road-to-recovery-50-days-after-shocking-heart-attack-913538115630