Posts

Break the Ice: Ways to Transform Workplace Acquaintances into a Team on onebeatcpr.com

Break the Ice: Ways to Transform Workplace Acquaintances into a Team

From CPR training to cooking competitions, there’s something to fit every company

A company is only as strong as its team. And a team is only as strong as the bonds between its members. As eye-rolling as some corporate bonding exercises can be, there are fun and inspiring alternatives, including CPR training. Read on for a sampling of our favorites.

Make the office fun again

You need not fly your team to Maui or buy out Fenway Park to give them valuable team-building opportunities. Introduce one or more of these office-based ideas to give their day-to-day a needed shot in the arm.

  1. Show off their culinary chops. Cooking competitions have become a staple of TV and are relatively easy to transform into activities that require strong leadership and quickly-learned cooperation. Pick a category (brunch! Greek! tropical!) or an ingredient (chickpeas! Twinkies! kale!) and let the creative juices flow.Ultimately, it’s up to the team whether the adventure ends up fantastically delicious or a flambéed disaster. And while not everyone on your staff likes to cook, it’s safe to say most of them like to eat. So set up a judging panel for those team members who aren’t Emeril or Giada.
  2. Work games into the daily calendar. Not everyone has the time (or desire) to get up from their desks and join that cutthroat game of Jenga or seven-card stud by the reception desk. But give employees the option to sign up for a slot as part of their regular work week and space may magically start to appear in those office calendars. Any concerns about lost productivity can be assuaged by increased rapport among your team plus some much-needed time to rest some brain muscles (and stretch others).
  3. Get personal. Simple bonding games such as Two Truths and a Lie allow your staff to get to know each other but within boundaries that they themselves set. It’s up to the individual which “truth” they decide to share, which allows them to open up in a safe environment. While ideal as an onboarding tool, it can also be a great brainteaser for long-term staff, as they will need to come up with new “truths” that their colleagues don’t yet know.

Get out of the office

As fun as you can make your home base, sometimes your team needs fresh air and a change of venue. Give these out-of-office adventures a try.

  1. Volunteer. Donating time towards a good cause is good for personal karma and also great for team bonding. Children’s hospitals, soup kitchens, and wilderness beautification are just a few of the many options out there that welcome large groups. Also consider allowing your staff to use their professional skills (copywriting, website design, marketing) to help short-staffed nonprofits.
  2. Underwrite a mystery dinner. At the end of a long day (or week) a nice dinner out can be just the thing to allow your employees to blow off steam and break bread as an extended family. The twist here is that the location and guest list will remain a mystery until the night of the event. Mix and match different teams to a variety of restaurants or staff members’ houses. Throw in an added perk with after-dinner drinks or dessert at one location so everyone can reconnect and share stories.
  3. Discover someplace new. A great night out can be perfect for some, but not all. Parents with young kids, people with two jobs, and many others may be much more likely to participate in a daytime outing. So take the day, pile into cars or a chartered bus, and explore a new place. That quaint town by the lake, an unusual museum, or even a nearby nature walk followed by lunch.

Train them to save lives

In addition to the obvious health and safety benefits to good CPR training, there are some extra perks that make this an even more appealing team-building option.

  1. Save lives, increase morale. Many businesses struggle to combat the “punch the clock” mentality that can set in for employees who may only see your company as a direct deposit blip on their digital bank statement. That mindset can quickly change once staff members put their lives in each other’s hands. In addition, most CPR classes require group participation and pairing off in teams, a great way to spend quality time and build trust with co-workers.
  2. Get to know your first aid kit. For the vast majority of people, the first aid kit that hangs on the wall or sits lonely next to the microwave in the break room is a passive comfort but little else. Training turns that plastic box of unfamiliar contents into critical tools that can save a life. Seconds matter after an accident and if your staff has a firm grasp of the tools at its disposal, the safer everyone will be. And a group setting ensures that coworkers will hold each other accountable for the information – you all learned it, you all need to own it.
  3. Serve your community. When your staff walks away from an afternoon of CPR training with their workplace comrades, they will now be equipped to make a valuable safety contribution in their homes and communities. Something this simple, and seemingly self-serving, can make your company a force for greater good on the local level. This benefit can’t be measured on a balance sheet but will be made real by the confidence and security felt by those who “punch the clock” for you every day.

One Beat CPR can be a key partner in this valuable team training for your organization, and it can be done offsite or we can bring the classes to your workplace. Learn more through our online resource guide.

The ABCs of AEDs on onebeatcpr.com

The ABCs of AEDs

What you need to know to save lives

We’ve seen it in movies and on TV dozens of times. Grandpa collapses in a shopping mall, mom faints at the airport, or young John from sales loses his balance at the gym and suddenly passes out. A friend or relative leaps into action and they start CPR. In real life, more often, folks are may also reach for an Automated External Defibrillator (AED).

What is (and isn’t) an AED?

A defibrillator is a medical device that stops fibrillation, an erratic heartbeat, by distributing an electrical shock or pulse of approximately 300 joules to the heart. This restores the heart to normal by stopping its uncontrolled trembling. The AED was developed in 1965 by Frank Pantridge, a physician at the Royal Victoria Infirmary in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

The goal was to allow lay people without medical training to use this technology to assist those in the midst of sudden cardiac arrest or who experience arrhythmia (an uneven heartbeat). Frank was of the firm belief that anyone who could perform CPR could operate a defibrillator. Further, he advocated that they are installed beside fire extinguishers, as life was more important than property.

The original prototype ran off car batteries and weighed close to a whopping 155 pounds, compared to today’s models which have a relative feather-weight of just over four pounds. He first installed the “portable” defibrillator in an ambulance, which allowed for patients experiencing cardiac arrest to receive treatment prior to arrival at the hospital. The technology quickly spread to the United States.

One common misconception about AEDs is that they can be used when the heart flat lines, or ceases to beat at all (diehard fans of ER or Grey’s Anatomy can be forgiven this false assumption). Defibrillators typically don’t completely restart the heart, they reset our body’s natural pacemaker so it functions properly.

An AED is also not to be confused with similar devices, such as Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (ICDs) or Wearable Cardioverter Defibrillators (WCDs). ICDs are battery-powered devices that are surgically implanted under the skin and connect to the heart via thin wires. They monitor the heart and send a shock if they detect an abnormal rhythm. WCDs perform similar functions but can be worn underneath clothing as a combination garment and monitor.

How does an AED work?

While the very concept of saving another person’s life can be daunting for most of us, the modern AED has been designed to make this miraculous task surprisingly simple. Each AED contains adhesive pads with electrodes which the user attaches to the victim’s chest. This is a simplified system based on hospital defibrillators, which use conductive gel to move the electricity along and hand-held panels with plastic handles to prevent medical professionals from experiencing the shock.

Proper placement of these pads is key to effectively assist the victim. There are two basic options:

  • Place one pad above and to the left of the heart, the other below and to the right.
  • Place the pads in front of and behind the heart.

The electrodes provide the AED’s computer with crucial information about the heart’s rhythm, that allows it to determine whether an electric shock is necessary and then to provide that shock. AEDs can be used on adults and children as young as 12 months (some devices have specially-sized pads for kids).

When should I use an AED?

Time is of the essence when a person goes into cardiac arrest. Most incidents stem from ventricular fibrillation (VF), a rapid and unsynchronized rhythm that begins in the heart’s lower chambers, or ventricles. Experts estimate that a victim’s chance of survival drops by seven to 10 percent every minute that a normal heartbeat isn’t restored.

First, be sure the person is actually in cardiac arrest. If you see them faint or come upon them already unconscious, confirm that they don’t respond to speaking, shouting, or shaking. In the case of an infant or young child, avoid shaking and instead give them a gentle but firm pinch. Check for breathing and a pulse. If neither is present, call 9-1-1, begin CPR, and seek out an AED.

You can often find AEDs in settings where crowds gather, such as schools, airports, gyms, malls, pools, hotels, and sports venues. They are easily recognizable and look much like a large first-aid kit, often with a heart logo emblazoned on the front.

Clear other bystanders from the immediate area, as touching the victim can interfere with the AED’s readings. Most AEDs provide voice commands that take you through each step of its use. Again, CPR is a key tool and should be administered before or after a shock. The device will likely instruct you when to begin CPR.

The effectiveness of AEDs can be profound. The American Heart Association estimates that survival rates double when bystanders use AEDs before emergency responders arrive. One Beat CPR can be a valuable partner in your organization’s AED purchases and training. You can learn more at our online store and resource guide.

February is Heart Month!

Today marks the first day of Heart Month! Heart Month will run from Feb 1 – 28, 2017. Check back daily for exciting news and event information.

        Heart disease is the leading cause of death for American adults, accounting for 1 in 4 deaths in the United States. Nearly half of Americans have at least one risk factor for heart disease, such as high blood pressure, obesity, physical inactivity, or an unhealthy diet. Risk also increases with age.
        Individuals of all ages can reduce their risk by making lifestyle changes and managing medical conditions with proper treatment. Take a CPR/AED class. Encourage your family members to make heart-healthy changes and offer support along the way.
        Our 2017 Heart Month focus is prevention. Learn more about heart disease prevention and heart-healthy behavior changes!
        We kick off the month with National Go Red Day on Friday, Feb. 3rd. On National Wear Red Day, be sure to wear something red to show your support for women with heart disease and stroke.
#HeartMonth #GoRedWearRed #OneBeatCPR

Texas Police Officer Uses CPR to Save 3-Year-Old Boy, Dramatic Save Story Caught on Dash-Cam Video – ABC News Today

aaa

Granbury, Texas, police officer, Chase Miller, was recently recognized by city officials for using CPR to save a 3-year-old boy.

On Oct. 12, Officer Miller responded to a 911 call requesting help at a Kentucky Fried Chicken for a little boy who was not breathing and unresponsive. Dash-cam footage from Miller’s vehicle showed him pulling into the restaurant’s parking lot minutes later.

The department said that after Miller got out of his vehicle, he encountered a group of people, including a crying woman carrying an unresponsive little boy in her arms.

The woman was identified as Bethany Hoover, 21, of Granbury, and the little boy as Hoover’s 3-year-old son, Brayden Geis. Brayden’s father, John Geis, 21, of Granbury, could also be seen in the video.

Hoover told ABC News today that Brayden had suffered a febrile seizure due to a cold he’d come down with.

A general manager at the Kentucky Fried Chicken, Hoover said she’d called her husband in to work as a cook that evening. She told him to bring along Brayden until her mother could come pick him up.

Hoover said at first, Brayden was playing but then started crying. She said she give him ibuprofen, but when she noticed how hot he was, she took him outside. The boy’s head was resting on his shoulder, Hoover said, and then she felt his arm go limp.

“[I] leaned him forward and he was having a seizure,” she said. “John called 911.”

Police said Miller began CPR and then had the boy’s dad continue chest compressions as he got a breathing mask. Police said that after two minutes, Miller had revived the child. Brayden was later treated by the Granbury Volunteer Fire Department and then taken to Lake Granbury Medical Center.

Hoover told ABC News that by the next day, Brayden was acting like nothing had happened though the fever still lingered.

At a City Council meeting Tuesday night, Miller was awarded the Life Saving Award for saving Brayden’s life. Miller also got to meet Brayden and his parents. The officer gave Brayden several gifts, including a toy police dog named Chase from the children’s show “Paw Patrol.”

aab-officer-miller-and-braden

“Officer Miller’s exceptional performance reflect great credit upon himself, the Granbury Police Department and the city of Granbury,” police said.

Hoover said that the three had visited Miller again at the police department today. She said that she and her husband had told Miller that they’d give him their world for saving Brayden.

“Our son is the world to us,” she said today. “That’s our world. That’s our life.”

 

Read the full story here: http://abcnews.go.com/US/texas-police-officer-honored-cpr-save-year-boy/story?id=42917245

 

Register For a FREE Heart Screening Today

Screenings Save Lives. Sign Up Today.

Screenings Save Lives. Sign Up Today.

Printable Heart My Kid Screening Flyer

After 7 years of planning under the umbrella of One Beat CPR, we are proud to announce the inaugural heart screening event of our independent non-profit organization, One Beat Foundation.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) does not discriminate. No matter the age, gender, or race, cardiovascular disease is among the leading causes of death in children and adolescents in the United States. The true prevalence of Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) in youth is unknown because of the lack of systemic reporting.

Early detection is crucial

Youth are not adequately screened for heart conditions.  Oftentimes, the warning signs and symptoms of a heart condition in youth go undetected or are misdiagnosed.  Most youth who suffer SCA have an undetected heart condition.  A thorough family history and physical examination that includes an electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) as a baseline test can help detect approximately 60% of the heart conditions that can lead to SCA. Approximately 2% of youth that are heart-screened are diagnosed with a heart abnormality or concern; 1% are diagnosed with a life-threatening heart condition such as Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM), Long QT Syndrome (LQTS), Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome (WPW) or Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia (ARVD).

Be aware of these signs and symptoms.  If any exist, they should be reported to the youth’s physician immediately.  Medical professionals must be more acutely aware of the warning signs & symptoms of a heart condition, carefully evaluated and assess patients,  and, when symptomatic, immediately refer youth to a cardiologist for further evaluation.

If a child is diagnosed with a heart condition, there are many precautionary steps that can be taken to prevent the likely outcome of SCA including lifestyle modifications, medication, surgical treatments, and implanting a pacemaker and/or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD).

Being Prepared Can Save a Life

Most occurrences of SCA in youth occur in public places.  The increased availability of publicly accessible automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in schools and school-sponsored athletic events will dramatically increase the probability that youth will survive SCA.  Knowing and properly executing the Cardiac Chain-of-Survival can help save a life.

For more information or to register for a free heart screening on Saturday, June 25th, please email lisette@onebeatcpr.com or call 954-321-5305.